Podcasts

Introducing The Women

Every week, host Rose Reid interviews changemakers, disruptors, and trailblazers from all over the world and across the aisle. The Women is now available wherever you get your podcasts. Listen here.

BONUS: Anticolonial Resistance with Dr. Priyamvada Gopal

Stay tuned for season 2 of Unpopular! In the meantime, enjoy this episode with Dr. Priyamvada Gopal, author of the book "Insurgent Empire: Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent," stops by the show to discuss how enslaved people and people who lived in the British colonies were not just passive subjects of British oppression. Dissenters at home in the U.K. and abroad rejected the tyranny of imperialism and actively rebelled against the empire, uniting different oppressed groups and insurgents along the way.


Find Dr. Priyamvada Gopal on Twitter @PriyamvadaGopal


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Introducing Worst Year Ever

2020 isn't going to be fun for anybody, left, right, or center. What many call the Most Important Election of Our Lifetime is going to be exhausting, ugly, angry, and probably at least a little racist. Listen as Robert, Katy, and Cody try to keep level heads covering the election while traveling the country, from the Iowa Caucus to gun shows and anti-vaccine conventions, finding out what Real America really wants and thinks during the, “Worst Year Ever.”

The first two episodes are now available. You can listen here.

Introducing Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

In Modern Ruhles, MSNBC anchor and NBC News correspondent Stephanie Ruhle brings her characteristic curiosity, empathy and insight to some of today’s thorniest, most complex conversations.

Modern Ruhles is now available. Listen here.

Enslaved women were involved in uprisings, even though prominent narratives of revolts focus on the actions of men. In this bonus episode, Yves speaks with Dr. Rebecca Hall about the reasons why women have not been widely recognized in the history of slave revolts and about some of the enslaved women who participated in rebellions. 
 
Keep up with Dr. Hall on Twitter @WakeRevolt 
 
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Let us know what you think about this bonus interview at unpopular@iheartmedia.com.

Richard Wright: Hurling Words Into Darkness

“I knew that I lived in a country in which the aspirations of black people were limited, marked-off. Yet I felt that I had to go somewhere and do something to redeem my being alive.” – Richard Wright, from “Black Boy.”

Richard Wright’s writing was controversial. His work was both praised as improving race relations and criticized as perpetuating dangerous stereotypes of Black people in the United States. James Baldwin took issue with Wright’s novel “Native Son” and protest fiction’s reductionist approach to race relations and Black humanity. Wright’s work ignited conversations about race and about the treatment and perspective of Black Americans. But the role of this literary protest in bettering Black lives and futures was disputable. 

Today’s episode wraps up season one of Unpopular. We’ll be back in October. But in the meantime, be on the lookout for bonus episodes. And don’t forget to share, rate, and review the show.

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Hans and Sophie Scholl: A Call to Action

Nazi Germany was oppressive, racist, and barbaric. Dissidents were arrested and killed under the Nazi regime. Still, vocal opponents of the government emerged. Some of them were involved in the White Rose, a nonviolent resistance group that distributed leaflets informing people of the Nazis’ atrocities and urging them to break their silence. Two people involved in that group were a sister and brother named Sophie and Hans Scholl. 
 
In this episode, we trace the Scholls’ path to resistance and look back on their efforts, which were cut short when the Nazis ordered their execution. What’s the value of spreading awareness against the state when it’s so massive, powerful, and unrelenting?

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Vincent Ogé: Privilege and Protest

Vincent Ogé was a free man of color in Saint-Domingue, or modern-day Haiti, in the mid- to late-18th century. He petitioned for the rights of wealthy free men of color – a class distinct from free Black slaves – but he upheld the institution of slavery. Ogé was not a revolutionary, and it’s hard to know the degree to which self-preservation, internalized racism and white supremacy, classism, ego, and compassion informed his decisions, separately. But his activism and sensationalized execution set the stage for the extension of rights to free men of color and heralded the uprising of enslaved people in Saint-Domingue. 
 
His resistance isn’t a model to follow to a T. It was exclusionary and executed at the expense of more marginalized and mistreated people, under the specific circumstances of that time. What Ogé did do was challenge racist colonial practices and advocate for the civil rights of an exclusive group of people of color. The question is, how can we put our specific privileges and powers to work in a meaningful way? 
 
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Andrei Sakharov: The Physics of Protest

Andrei Sakharov was a nuclear physicist whose secret work was instrumental in the secret development of Soviet thermonuclear weapons. Initially committed to the necessity of his contributions to the design, construction, and testing of hydrogen bombs, Sakharov began to feel the pressure of personal and professional responsibility. The testing and deployment of nuclear weapons was a moral and biological issue that Sakharov could no longer condone. And he became a dissident. He said in an essay, “Freedom of thought is the only guarantee of the feasibility of a scientific democratic approach to politics, economy, and culture.”

Sakharov’s activism extended beyond disarmament, though. He campaigned for peace and human rights, and he was exiled for his dissent. If Sakharov’s story carries any weight, major turns in thought and action are not impossible, even though they may take a while.

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The Mirabal Sisters – Patria, Minerva, Maria Teresa, and Dedé – were known as las Mariposas (the Butterflies) in the anti-Rafael Trujillo underground. The Trujillo regime openly persecuted and even killed dissidents and opponents. Still, the sisters organized a resistance against the dictatorship in the Dominican Republic and put their lives on the line in doing so. They raised awareness about the brutality of the regime and prepared for an armed uprising. 
 
Until their assassination, they fought for freedom from fear and state oppression and terrorism. For that they remained a threat in the eyes of Trujillo. But that same activism and dedication to creating a better future for the Dominican people inspired in others the will to protest and the ability to envision progress. 
 
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Email us at unpopular@iheartmedia.com.